POLICY

Refund Policy

Please note that UMC High School does not issue refunds. Within hours of enrollment, our administration undertakes many tasks including activating the student account, completing the enrollment, contracting the teacher, establishing electronic/physical files, tracking the enrollment for Ministry purposes, etc. UMC High School incurs the costs of these many tasks upon enrollment. This initial work is the reason for our no-refund policy. Even if the student does not begin the course, the preliminary work in our office will be completed as we expect the student to complete the course. Due to this, all registrants must think carefully about the courses for which they are registering.

Course Transfer Policy

A student has the option to transfer from one course to another within the first three months of registration. If a student requests a transfer, an administrative fee will be required as the preliminary work will have to be repeated by our staff. A fee of $100 will apply if the student has not completed any of the assessments. A fee of $175 will apply if the student has completed no more than three assessments. Transfers will not be available to a student who has completed more than three assessments or who has not requested a transfer within the three month period. The decision of the UMC HIGH SCHOOL Registrar is final in all cases involving refund requests and course transfers.

Student Enrolment Policy

Students should move chronologically through the lessons posted in the calendar for the course in which they are registered. The student can start the course within 24 hours of registration and move through the course at his or her own pace. The only restriction placed on the student is that the student must complete the course within SIX months. The student will be unenrolled from the course if he or she takes longer than six months to complete the course.

Course Prerequisite Policy

Certain courses require the student to have completed a prerequisite course. While UMC HIGH SCHOOL will allow the student to begin the course without providing evidence that the required prerequisite has been completed, it is the student’s responsibility to obtain and send us a copy of his or her Ontario Student Transcript (OST), Report Card or Credit Counselling Summary which proves to UMC HIGH SCHOOL that he or she has achieved the prerequisite for the course. UMC High School will not issue the student a midterm or final report or transcript until the student provides evidence that the prerequisite course has been completed. This document may be mailed, faxed, or scanned and attached to an email to info@umchighschool.com
Conversely, the student may not have completed the prerequisite course. This student may request that the UMC HIGH SCHOOL Guidance team waive the course prerequisite requirement. The criteria used by the Guidance team to determine if the prerequisite course is to be waived is the student’s maturity and/or education level. If you are a mature student or if you have additional education beyond your high school record, then contact the UMC HIGH SCHOOL Guidance team before you register for the course to request that the prerequisite be waived.

Tuition refund policies, course transfer policies, student enrollment policies and course prerequisite policies may be modified at any time at the UMC High School website. The use of UMC High School courses indicates that the student accepts these aforementioned policies.

UMC High School, BSID #666482, is a fully inspected and accredited private school by the Ministry of Education, Province of Ontario. Its OSSD credits are recognized by other high schools in Ontario and around the world as well as recognized by all universities and colleges around the world. UMC High School offers highly interactive high school courses fully online. The content of each course follows its designated curriculum guideline and is written by teachers acting within their professional disciplines. Our course content covers virtually everything that a brick-and-mortar school course covers, except that it is delivered in a virtual mode. All of our courses are password protected, ensuring a secure and safe environment for the students. Within this environment, we have created an innovative and comprehensive set of customizable online learning tools to assist students in their learning. An online learning environment requires diverse course content. With this in mind, UMC High School offers many engaging features to create a stimulating learning environment for the students.

For more detail information, please contact UMC HIGH SCHOOL Administration Office.

MISSION STATEMENT

UMC High School’s main objective is to educate our students to become international leaders who can be the bridge for peoples, nations, and societies. UMC High School students will be trained to be able to speak at least two languages fluently and understand other cultures with respect. UMC High School recognizes the importance of completing high school. Well-educated young people form the social and economic foundation of society by entering the workforce with the essential skills required for success or by continuing into higher education where they will further grow and develop before eventually becoming assets to society.

UMC High School was founded on the three ideals as reflected by the UMC High School motto: Commitment, Compassion and Connection. We cultivate in our students the basic knowledge and values they need in order to lead in this contemporary international society.

CODE OF BEHAVIOUR

Every student in Ontario is required to remain in secondary school until they reach the age of eighteen or obtain an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD). UMC High School aims to provide each student with the opportunity to achieve success according to the student’s own interests, abilities and goals. By providing a quality online education within the student’s greater educational community, UMC High School can offer the student more choice. While we may have changed the form of the traditional physical school in which this mission is carried out, we have not changed the provision of providing quality education to the student. UMC High School extends into the actual home of the student, where we provide all of the essential components necessary for a quality education.

 

Student - Teacher Interaction

The student can interact in meaningful ways with his or her UMC HIGH SCHOOL teacher from anywhere in the world as long as they have an internet connection. A host of communication tools and procedures have been developed by Schoology in order to facilitate this essential communication component of a quality education. These include email, threaded discussions, ePortfolio, and assignment Google Drive feedback. A UMC HIGH SCHOOL student has many ways of communicating with the teacher and the teacher has many ways of communicating information and ideas back to the student. Regular review of student work is how the instructor will verify the work belongs to said student.

Student - Student Interaction

A host of communication tools and procedures have been developed by Schoology to facilitate the essential component of student – student of a quality education, student – student interaction. A student has many ways of communicating with other students in his or her course. These include email, chat, instant messaging, sharing files and threaded discussions. Students may also conveniently interact with active students back through time.

Student - Administration Interaction

With multiple tools at their disposal, the UMC High School Principal and his administration may intervene early in managing attendance, proper conduct, and other problems within the various courses. The goal is to ensure that the technology does not become a deterrent to effective learning. Prompt and early intervention solves small problems before they become impediments to the learning process. The student has quick and easy access to the UMC High School Principal and other staff via email, phone and instant messaging.

Student - Resources Interaction

The student has access to quality online courses and can easily view resources provided by the teacher to enhance their learning experience. The student will also have access to both career information, which is being built into every course to meet with Ministry expectations of the curriculum, as well as more general career information provided on an ‘as-needed’ basis.

The student has access to quality online courses and can easily view resources provided by the teacher to enhance their learning experience. The student will also have access to both career information, which is being built into every course to meet with Ministry expectations of the curriculum, as well as more general career information provided on an ‘as-needed’ basis.

Parent - School Interaction

The parents or guardians of students under 18 and the parents, with the permission of adult students, may have access to the student’s online course including assessment and evaluation items. If the student does not share the access directly with the parent, the parent can contact the UMC High School Principal for information or access. This allows the parents to become more involved with the education of their son or daughter. An online, transparent electronic grade books, electronic report cards, online conferencing and direct phone contact with the UMC High School Principal, also promotes parental involvement.

Periodic news items are posted online at the UMC High School website on occasion by the school to an area viewable by parents and the broader community. (www.umchighschool.com or umconline.ca). In addition, students, parents and other educators have left comments concerning UMC HIGH SCHOOL with us which have been posted at Schoology.

With UMC High School, parents have the responsibility and opportunity to work with their son or daughter in the planning of their secondary school education. The final decision of the course selection of students under the age of 18 rests with the parents. All students and their parents should consider seriously the advice and recommendation of the school. The consequences of course selection can be extremely important whether students plan to work, or attend college or university. Detailed courses of study are available at the school website for perusal. (online school website course section)

Hardware and Software Requirements

Schoology is an online Integrated Learning Platform and requires an internet connection to be accessed. In order to login and use the service your browser is required to have JavaScript and Cookies enabled. Furthermore desktops are required to have Adobe Flash Player 10.1, or greater, installed.

Schoology is supported on the following Internet Browsers*:

Desktop Browser Support:

Browser Supported Browser Version(s) Maintenance Browser Version(s)**
Internet Explorer
11+ (For Windows 8 and previous versions)
9
Firefox
Latest
n/a
Chrome
Latest
n/a
Safari
10 and 11
5.1
Edge
For Windows 10+
n/a

*Please refer to your specific browsers system requirements to determine the appropriate hardware and software requirements for the browser.
**Maintenance Browser Versions are currently supported, but will lose support in the near future.

Tablet/Mobile Browser/Operating System Support:

Device Operating System Browser Supported Browser Version(s)
Android
Android 4.4
Android
Latest
Apple
iOS 9 or above
Safari
Latest

Some courses also require the use of additional software such as Microsoft Office Suite, Adobe Acrobat, and more. Some courses may require additional hardware such as a camera, microphone or speakers. Please refer to the specific course outline to determine if any additional software or hardware is required or provided in the course.

PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION

Our philosophy of education is to provide the highest quality of education to all students attending the school. We pride ourselves in promoting the academic, social, physical and character development of our students by providing them with a challenging, varied and supportive learning environment.

We set high personal and academic standards for all our students. We believe with positive support and direction that students will rise to the challenge of any expectation. Our students are recognized and respected as unique individuals, and their success reflects our own dedication to providing a high-quality, well-rounded education.

Teaching through lived experience challenges students to discover learning through meaningful tasks. This is achieved through a project-oriented curriculum, educational field trips, and a range of co-curricular activities.
Communication is the foundation to building a secure, respectful and inclusive community of learners. Administration, teachers, students and parents are constantly involved in a strong network of communication to ensure that the needs of all of its members are being met accordingly.

To that end, our teaching staff is composed of Bachelor of Education graduates, ESL accredited teachers and specialized instructors who have experience teaching at all levels. We offer a learning environment that is positive, supportive and respectful to all students from a diverse range of backgrounds.

OUR GOALS

Establishing and Refining our Assessment and Evaluation Process by:

  • using the assessment and evaluation guidelines provided by the Ontario Ministry of Education in all activities.
  • using evidence from assessment and evaluation processes to determine student understanding.
  • keeping all records of assessment and develop effective strategies to which all teachers can refer.
  • monitoring the use of assessment and evaluation practices in order to evaluate effectiveness and to develop the best teaching strategies in the future.

Catering to the unique learning needs of international students by:

  • providing extra support to these students either within the classroom or through outside the classroom.
  • successfully integrating international students into appropriate courses/programs based on test results, background, and previous education.

Educating students based on their full potential based on academic achievement and proper discipline by providing:

  • leadership in the shared responsibility for education that exists among students, families, and the community;
  • role models of Canadian multi-cultural values and beliefs;
  • guidance in what students need to learn;
  • instruction in the learning process;
  • academic and technological instruction;
  • feedback on students‟ proficiency and performance.

We envision students who:

  • pursue academic excellence;
  • demonstrate appropriate knowledge and ability;
  • conduct themselves with self-esteem and self respect;
  • make every effort to be the best they can be;
  • demonstrate skills for developing and maintaining personal and family wellness
  • demonstrate global and community responsibility

TECHNOLOGY IN THE CURRICULUM

In preparation for further education, employment, citizenship, and lifelong learning, students and teachers must be capable of deriving meaning from information by using a wide variety of information literacy skills. By virtue of the fact that UMC High School courses are entirely online, students will experience first hand the benefits of a technologically enriched education and thereby acquire skills for the 21st century. Increasing reliance on computers, networks, and information technologies in society makes it essential for students to become computer literate and to develop information literacy skills. Information literacy is the ability to access, find, select, gather, critically evaluate, create, and communicate information. The UMC High School places a great deal of emphasis on using the information obtained to solve problems and make decisions.

 

Software Programs for Students

As part of their training in computer and information literacy, students should become familiar with a wide range of available software programs. Among the applications that can aid student learning are simulations, multimedia resources, databases, and computer-assisted learning modules, many of which have been developed for use in particular disciplines. Students will also be expected to use software applications that help them develop general skills in such areas as writing, problem solving, research, and communication. It is important that students learn to critically evaluate the accuracy, validity, currency, comprehensiveness, and depth of the information they access using information technology, particularly the Internet. In general, students must acquire the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to allow them to use computer and information technology safely, effectively, confidently, and ethically.

Collaboration Tools for Teachers

The curriculum writers for the UMC High School work collaboratively within and across disciplines to effectively plan for the integration of computers and information technologies into the teaching/learning process. As the technology capable of enhancing student learning becomes available, our teachers should, within a reasonable period of time, incorporate that technology into their planning of instruction and learning activities in individual disciplines and, collaboratively, across disciplines. Effective communication programs can also help to promote the development of information literacy skills among all students by supporting and coordinating the collaborative planning and implementation of reading programs, inquiry and research tasks, and independent study.

Courses Codes

Each course is worth one credit, unless otherwise indicated, which requires a minimum of 110 hours of study. All courses offered are at the academic, open, university or university/college preparation level. The codes for each course are 5 to 6 characters long. The first 3 letters represent the Ministry approved course title, the fourth position indicates the grade or language level, the fifth position indicates the course type and the sixth, the program or credit differentiation or the focus of the course.

Transfer Courses

A transfer course is a partial-credit course that bridges the gap between courses of two different types in the same subject and grade. Transfer courses enable students to achieve the expectations not covered in one course type but required for entry into a course in the next grade. For example, the prerequisite for the Grade 11 university preparation course in English is the Grade 10 academic course in English. A student who has taken the applied English course in Grade 10 and decides to enter the university preparation course in Grade 11 may do so by taking a transfer course.
A transfer course may be taken as a summer course or as an independent-study or partial-credit course within school hours.

Prerequisites

Students are expected to complete the necessary prerequisites required for enrolment in identified courses in our course descriptions. If a parent or an adult student requests that a prerequisite be waived, the principal will determine whether or not the prerequisite should be waived. The principal may also initiate consideration of whether a prerequisite should be waived. The principal will make his or her decision in consultation with the parent or adult student and appropriate school staff. The student must have consistently demonstrated the skills and knowledge at a level that will ensure their success in a course without completing the required prerequisite, and will require the written approval of a parent or guardian where the student is less than 18 years of age.

Course Outlines/Ontario Curriculum Documents

The courses offered have been developed according to the requirements of the Ministry of Education. Course outlines are available for perusal in the school office. All Ontario curriculum documents are available online at the Ministry of Education website.

Courses Offered

Offering for the 2016-2017 academic year:

Discipline Course Course Code Grade Prerequisite
The Arts (A) Visual Arts AVI3M 11 AVI2O/1O
AVI4M 12 AVI3M/3O
Drama ADA1O 9 None
Media Arts ASM2O 10 None
Business Studies (B) Business BBI1O 9 None
Marketing BMI3C 11 None
Organizational
Behaviour
BOH4M 12 None
Accounting BAF3M 11 None
BAT4M 12 BAF3M
Int’l.Business BBB4M 12 None
Canadian and
World Studies(C)
Civics CHV2O 10 None
Economics CIA4U 12 Any 3/4U or 3/4M course
in C, E or H
Geography CGC1P 9 None
CGW4U 12 Any 3/4U or 3/4M course
in C, E or H
History CHC2D 10 None
English (E) English ENG2D 10 ENG1D or ENG1P
ENG3U 11 ENG2D
ENG4U 12 ENG3U
OLC4O 12 See the eligibility
requirement
ESL ESL ESLBO Level 2 None
ESLCO Level 3 None
ESLDO Level 4 None
ESLEO Level 5 None
ELD ELDBO Level 2 None
ELDCO Level 3 None
ELDDO Level 4 None
French as
a Second Language (F)
Core French FSF1O 9 None
Guidance and
Career Education (G)
Career Studies GLC2O 10 None
Health and
Physical Education (P)
Health and
Physical Education
PPL2O 10 None
PPL 3O 11 None
PPL 4O 12 None
Mathematics (M) Mathematics MPM 1D 9 None
MPM 2D 10 MPM1D
MCR 3U 11 MPM2D
MHF 4U 12 MCR3U or MCT4C
MCV 4U 12 MHF4U (prerequisite
or co-requisite)
MDM 4U 12 MCR3U or MCF3M
Science (S) Science SNC 1D 9 None
SNC 2D 10 SNC1D
Biology SBI 3U 11 SNC2D
SBI 4U 12 SBI3U
Chemistry SCH 3U 11 SNC2D
SCH 4U 12 SCH3U
Physics SPH 3U 11 SNC2D
SPH 4U 12 SPH3U
Social Sciences
and Humanities (H)
Family Studies HFA4U 12 Any 3/4U, 3/4M or 3/4C course
in H, E or C
Computer Studies Intro to Com Sci ICS 3U 11 None
Com Sci ICS 4U 12 ICS3U

Note: Not all courses will be offered each semester. Enrollment numbers will determine course offerings.

This Program and Course Calendar is designed to help you meet your individual and academic needs. It is also meant to encourage parents/guardians and students to keep themselves up-to-date with what is going on in secondary education in Ontario and the programs in their school.

How to use resourses

COURSE CALENDAR

The UMC High School course Calendar will provide you with information about our school, our programs and the academic requirements that will assist you in developing your academic plan for obtaining an Ontario School Diploma. Although the calendar will provide you with important information about obtaining an Ontario Secondary School Diploma, you are strongly advised to consult with our Principal to verify and confirm that your academic plan is the most appropriate and flexible for you careers goals. We encourage you to familiarize yourself with the general information in the Calendar. It is your responsibility to ensure that the courses you choose are appropriate to program requirements.

The Calendar will help you understand the course selections process and provide information on the courses and programs offered at UMC High School.

Inside you will find:
• diploma requirements
• information related to secondary education in UMC High School
• descriptions of programs
• school course offerings
• course descriptions and prerequisites.

As you read through the Calendar and begin to make decisions about the courses you will take during the next school year, keep the following in mind:
• your long-term goals
• your desired destination-post-

Every year we offer a few new courses, so please check with your guidance councilor for exact dates and the up-to-date course descriptions. Please note that some courses may be cancelled or combined depending on student enrollment.

Please Note: With the implementation of Bill 52, The Education Amendment Act, learning to Age 18, 2006, students are required to stay in school until the age of 18 or until their completion of the OSSD.

UMC Online SCHOOL POLICIES

It is the duty and responsibility of the Principal of the UMC High School to enforce the consequences when people do not obey the code of behaviour expected of all people within our online school community.

 

Attendance

Regular attendance in any learning environment is vital to school success. Courses content and learning activities have been designed to be 110 hours for all full credit courses or 55 hours for all half credit courses. Log in and log out times will be recorded through the online platform. Completion of activities found on the platform will be checked by the instructor. Students who do not participate in their online course regularly will diminish their learning experience. The following processes have been put into place to encourage regular attendance by the student:

  • The Principal will maintain attendance records as it is expected that students and teachers should login to their course on a regular basis. Students and/or parents will be contacted if they have not logged in within a month’s time.
  • Due to the continuous entry and exit model of our school, there is no prescribed yearly or even semesterized calendar. It is expected that a typical online course will take approximately 110 days or 4 months for the student to complete (assuming a minimum of 1.25 hour per day online participation), but this time may start or end arbitrarily.
  • Students should maintain log of online and offline activities.
  • Students who leave a course before completion must communicate their intentions either in writing to the Principal or over the phone in the interest of up-to-date record keeping, before any request can be acted upon.
  • To encourage attendance, the Principal will work with the curriculum writers, to set manageable assessment and evaluation assignments early in the course, in order to give the student positive feedback and breakdown any existing technology barriers.
  • Students who have not completed their course within 6 months from the day of enrollment in that course, will be automatically unenrolled from the course.

Safe School Environment

The UMC High School makes considerable effort to provide and maintain a safe environment in which learning can occur. Protection of a person’s dignity and self-esteem is critical. The following processes have been put into place to create a safe school environment for the student:

  • Students and teachers are to create a shared Google Drive for school functions (completing of assigned materials, submission of assignments, online discussions and comments). Inappropriate electronic material are not permitted in the Google Drive. The school reserves the right to inspect the Drive, when and where the welfare of the school is involved.
  • All students are expected to treat other students, teachers and admin staff with respect, courtesy and consideration. Profanity will not be acceptable in any of the communication tools provided within the online courses.
  • All students will accept the authority of the teachers and all teachers will demonstrate respect for all students.
  • Threats, distasteful remarks, abuse of any kind, or harassment by any individual which impairs the health and welfare of any student or staff member is not permitted and is to be reported to the UMC High School Principal immediately. The Principal will meter out the consequence according to the situation.

Attendance

The school reserves the right to monitor all material in user accounts on the file server in order to determine the appropriateness of computer use when a challenge has arisen. The following processes have been put into place:

  •  The Schoology Integrated Learning Platform at the UMC High School is intended for educational purposes only. Any use of any tool within course for any other purpose other than the intended educational purpose is prohibited. The inappropriate uses include, but are not limited to, criminal, obscene, commercial, or illegal purposes.
  • Student access into the Schoology platform is provided as long as the student follows the guidelines set by the school Principal, provincial, and federal laws.
  • If the platform is used inappropriately or in a prohibited manner, the Principal reserves the right to terminate the registration or suspend the user. There is the possibility of further disciplinary action including legal prosecution, if the appropriate laws, regulations, or contracts deem it necessary.
  • Malicious platform damage, interference or mischief will be reported to the appropriate authorities.
  •  It is important to be aware that activities in an online environment are not private. The school reserves the right to monitor all material that is placed in a user’s account and to remove it if deemed necessary.
  • The security of the online environment is only as effective as the practices of its users. Therefore, it is important that the student user:
    • Never reveal your password to your course to any individual except your parent.
    • Always report to your Principal any email or chat message which causes you concern or any message which requests inappropriate personal information from you.
    • Never attempt to access unauthorized material or to impersonate another user. Any attempt to vandalize, harm or destroy data of another user is prohibited. Any attempt to vandalize the data of the course or school is also prohibited.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism occurs when a student presents another person’s work as the student’s own. This is not acceptable at UMC High School. The UMC High School Plagiarism Policy is designed to teach the student to identify plagiarism, to distinguish between the two types of plagiarism, to identify strategies to avoid plagiarism, to practice proper paraphrasing and to explain the consequences of plagiarism by the student. UMC HIGH SCHOOL teachers have access to software which detects plagiarism. Commercial search engines are often very good at detecting work copied from material available online. Teachers have experience and can often spot when writing does not come from the student.

Negligent Plagiarism means presenting someone’s work as your own in an accidental, naïve, careless or reckless way. This often happens when a student paraphrases incorrectly or when a student borrows words or phrases from another source and forgets to cite the source.

Dishonest Plagiarism means that the student has knowingly presenting a person’s work as their own. All instances of plagiarism that are not considered to be negligent plagiarism will be assumed to be dishonest plagiarism. Examples of dishonest plagiarism are:

  • borrowing facts or information that are not common knowledge and not citing the source. Common knowledge includes things that are commonly known, such as: Toronto is the capital of Ontario. Charles Darwin proposed a theory of evolution, HIVAids can kill you, etc. Common knowledge facts do not have to be cited;
  • cutting and pasting text from websites with no intention to cite the source;
  • handing in an on-line essay or portions of one as though it were your own work;
  • copying another person’s work and presenting it as your own;
  • using another person’s ‘lab’ findings from an activity or experiment;
  • having another person write a portion or all of your final exam;

This means you must not cheat or try to cheat in any way. It hopefully means that you will come to value your achievement when it is honestly, fairly and respectfully won through hard work.

Academic Integrity

UMC High School is committed to ensuring the integrity and validity of student achievement within its courses by promoting academic honesty among its students. Students are responsible for upholding integrity and will be held accountable for the quality of their work and actions. UMC HIGH SCHOOL takes preventative measures to reduce the incidence of academic dishonesty among its students. UMC HIGH SCHOOL may review any work or correspondence submitted by a student to determine its authenticity and legitimacy. Academic dishonesty will not be tolerated. Students who violate the academic integrity of UMC HIGH SCHOOL will be subject to discipline in accordance with this policy. Academic dishonesty consists of any deliberate attempt to falsify, fabricate or otherwise tamper with data information, records, or any other material that is relevant to the student’s participation within any course. Academic offenses include, but are not limited to:

  • Cheating or other forms of academic dishonesty intended to gain unfair academic advantage;
  • Distributing or receiving answers or other information by means other than those expressly permitted by the teacher as part of any assignment, test or the final examination;
  • Copying answers, or other information (or allowing others to do so) during any assignment, quiz or the final examination in which a student is not permitted to work jointly with others;
  • Submitting academic work for assessment that was purchased or acquired from another source;
  • Assuming another individual’s identity or allowing another person to do so on the student’s behalf for the purpose of fulfilling any academic requirement or in any way enhancing the student’s grade or academic standing;
  • Using any device, implement, or other form of study aid during the final examination without permission, or as explicitly stated within a student’s Individual Education Plan (IEP);
  • Allowing another individual to access course content, a quiz, unit test or final exam at any time while the student is completing an assessment;
  • Accessing course content or external content during the final exam.

Students will be required to demonstrate the ability to do the work on their own in order to attain a mark.

Course Descriptions

Art

Visual Arts, Grade 11, University/College Preparation (AVI3M)
This course enables students to further develop their knowledge and skills in visual arts. Students will use the creative process to explore a wide range of themes through studio work that may include drawing, painting, sculpting, and printmaking, as well as the creation of collage, multimedia works, and works using emerging technologies. Students will use the critical analysis process when evaluating their own work and the work of others. The course may be delivered as a comprehensive program or through a program focused on a particular art form (e.g., photography, video, computer graphics, information design).
Prerequisite: Visual Arts, Grade 9 or 10, Open

Visual Arts, Grade 12, University/College Preparation (AVI4M)
This course focuses on enabling students to refine their use of the creative process when creating and presenting two- and three-dimensional art works using a variety of traditional and emerging media and technologies. Students will use the critical analysis process to deconstruct art works and explore connections between art and society. The studio program enables students to explore a range of materials, processes, and techniques that can be applied in their own art production. Students will also make connections between various works of art in personal, contemporary, historical, and cultural contexts.
Prerequisite: Visual Arts, Grade 11, University/College Preparation

Drama, Grade 9, Open (ADA1O)
This course provides opportunities for students to explore dramatic forms and techniques, using material from a wide range of sources and cultures. Students will use the elements of drama to examine situations and issues that are relevant to their lives. Students will create, perform, discuss, and analyse drama, and then reflect on the experiences to develop an understanding of themselves, the art form, and the world around them.
Prerequisite: None

Media Arts, Grade 10, Open (ASM2O)
This course enables students to create media art works by exploring new media, emerging technologies such as digital animation, and a variety of traditional art forms such as film, photography, video, and visual arts. Students will acquire communications skills that are transferable beyond the media arts classroom and develop an understanding of responsible practices related to the creative process. Students will develop the skills necessary to create and interpret media art works.
Prerequisite: None

BUSINESS STUDIES

Introduction to Business, Grade 9 or 10, Open (BBI1O, BBI2O)
This course introduces students to the world of business. Students will develop an understanding of the functions of business, including accounting, marketing, information and communication technology, human resources, and production, and of the importance of ethics and social responsibility. This course builds a foundation for further studies in business and helps students develop the business knowledge and skills they will need in their everyday lives.
Prerequisite: None

Marketing: Goods, Services, Events, Grade 11, College Preparation (BMI3C)
This course introduces the fundamental concepts of product marketing, which includes the marketing of goods, services, and events. Students will examine how trends, issues, global economic changes, and information technology influence consumer buying habits. Students will engage in marketing research, develop marketing strategies, and produce a marketing plan for a product of their choice.
Prerequisite: None

Financial Accounting Fundamentals, Grade 11, University/College Preparation (BAF3M)
This course introduces students to the fundamental principles and procedures of accounting. Students will develop financial analysis and decision-making skills that will assist them in future studies and/or career opportunities in business. Students will acquire an understanding of accounting for a service and a merchandising business, computerized accounting, financial analysis, and ethics and current issues in accounting.
Prerequisite: None

Financial Accounting Principles, Grade 12, University/College Preparation (BAT4M)
This course introduces students to advanced accounting principles that will prepare them for postsecondary studies in business. Students will learn about financial statements for various forms of business ownership and how those statements are interpreted in making business decisions. This course expands students’ knowledge of sources of financing, further develops accounting methods for assets, and introduces accounting for partnerships and corporations.
Prerequisite: Financial Accounting Fundamentals, Grade 11, University/College Preparation

International Business Fundamentals, Grade 12, University/College Preparation (BBB4M)
This course provides an overview of the importance of international business and trade in the global economy and explores the factors that influence success in international markets. Students will learn about the techniques and strategies associated with marketing, distribution, and managing international business effectively. This course prepares students for postsecondary programs in business, including international business, marketing, and management.
Prerequisite: None

Business Leadership: Management Fundamentals, Grade 12, University/College Preparation (BOH4M)
This course focuses on the development of leadership skills used in managing a successful business. Students will analyse the role of a leader in business, with a focus on decision making, management of group dynamics, workplace stress and conflict, motivation of employees, and planning. Effective business communication skills, ethics, and social responsibility are also emphasized.
Prerequisite: None

CANADIAN AND WORLD STUDIES

Issues in Canadian Geography, Grade 9, Applied (CGC1P)
This course focuses on current geographic issues that affect Canadians. Students will draw on their personal and everyday experiences as they explore issues relating to food and water supplies, competing land uses, interactions with the natural environment, and other topics relevant to sustainable living in Canada. They will also develop an awareness that issues that affect their lives in Canada are interconnected with issues in other parts of the world. Throughout the course, students will use the concepts of geographic thinking, the geographic inquiry process, and spatial technologies to guide and support their investigations.
Prerequisite: None

Civics, Grade 10, Open (CHV 2O)
This course explores rights and responsibilities associated with being an active citizen in a democratic society. Students will explore issues of civic importance such as healthy schools, community planning, environmental responsibility, and the influence of social media, while developing their understanding of the role of civic engagement and of political processes in the local, national, and/or global community. Students will apply the concepts of political thinking and the political inquiry process to investigate, and express informed opinions about, a range of political issues and developments that are both of significance in today’s world and of personal interest to them.
Prerequisite: None

Canadian History Since World War I, Grade 10, Academic (CHC2D)
This course explores social, economic, and political developments and events and their impact on the lives of different groups in Canada since 1914. Students will examine the role of conflict and cooperation in Canadian society, Canada’s evolving role within the global community, and the impact of various individuals, organizations, and events on Canadian identity, citizenship, and heritage. They will develop their ability to apply the concepts of historical thinking and the historical inquiry process, including the interpretation and analysis of evidence, when investigating key issues and events in Canadian history since 1914.
Prerequisite: None

Analysing Current Economic Issues, Grade 12, University Preparation (CIA4U)
This course examines current Canadian and international economic issues, developments, policies, and practices from diverse perspectives. Students will explore the decisions that individuals and institutions, including governments, make in response to economic issues such as globalization, trade agreements, economic inequalities, regulation, and public spending. Students will apply the concepts of economic thinking and the economic inquiry process, as well as economic models and theories, to investigate, and develop informed opinions about, economic trade-offs, growth, and sustainability and related economic issues.
Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English, or social sciences and humanities

World Issues: A Geographic Analysis, Grade 12, University Preparation (CGW4U)
In this course, students will address the challenge of creating a more sustainable and equitable world. They will explore issues involving a wide range of topics, including economic disparities, threats to the environment, globalization, human rights, and quality of life, and will analyse government policies, international agreements, and individual responsibilities relating to them. Students will apply the concepts of geographic thinking and the geographic inquiry process, including the use of spatial technologies, to investigate these complex issues and their impacts on natural and human communities around the world.
Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in Canadian and world studies, English, or social sciences and humanities

ENGLISH

English, Grade 10, Academic (ENG2D)
This course is designed to extend the range of oral communication, reading, writing, and media literacy skills that students need for success in their secondary school academic programs and in their daily lives. Students will analyse literary texts from contemporary and historical periods, interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on the selective use of strategies that contribute to effective communication. This course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 11 university or college preparation course.
Prerequisite: English, Grade 9, Academic or Applied

English, Grade 11, University Preparation (ENG3U)
This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures, as well as a range of informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college preparation course.
Prerequisite: English, Grade 10, Academic

English, Grade 12, University Preparation (ENG4U)
This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading, and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college, or the workplace.
Prerequisite: English, Grade 11, University Preparation

Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course, Grade 12, Open (OLC4O)
This course is designed to help students acquire and demonstrate the cross-curricular literacy skills that are evaluated by the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT). Students who complete the course successfully will meet the provincial literacy requirement for graduation. Students will read a variety of informational, narrative, and graphic texts and will produce a variety of forms of writing, including summaries, information paragraphs, opinion pieces, and news reports. Students will also maintain and manage a portfolio containing a record of their reading experiences and samples of their writing.
Eligibility requirement: Students who have been eligible to write the OSSLT at least twice and who have been unsuccessful at least once are eligible to take the course. (Students who have already met the literacy requirement for graduation may be eligible to take the course under special circumstances, at the discretion of the principal.)

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

English as a Second Language, ESL Level 2, Open (ESLBO)
This course extends students’ listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in English for everyday and academic purposes. Students will participate in conversations, in structured situations, on a variety of familiar and new topics; read a variety of texts designed or adapted for English language learners; expand their knowledge of English grammatical structures and sentence patterns; and link English sentences to compose paragraphs. The course also supports students’ continuing adaptation to the Ontario school system by expanding their knowledge of diversity in their new province and country.
Prerequisite: None

English as a Second Language, ESL Level 3, Open (ESLCO)
This course further extends students’ skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in English for a variety of everyday and academic purposes. Students will make short classroom oral presentations; read a variety of adapted and original texts in English; and write using a variety of text forms. As well, students will expand their academic vocabulary and their study skills to facilitate their transition to the mainstream school program. This course also introduces students to the rights and responsibilities inherent in Canadian citizenship, and to a variety of current Canadian issues.
Prerequisite: None

English as a Second Language, ESL Level 4, Open (ESLDO)
This course prepares students to use English with increasing fluency and accuracy in classroom and social situations and to participate in Canadian society as informed citizens. Students will develop the oral-presentation, reading, and writing skills required for success in all school subjects. They will extend listening and speaking skills through participation in discussions and seminars; study and interpret a variety of grade-level texts; write narratives, articles, and summaries in English; and respond critically to a variety of print and media texts.
Prerequisite: None

English as a Second Language, ESL Level 5, Open (ESLEO)
This course provides students with the skills and strategies they need to make the transition to college and university preparation courses in English and other secondary school disciplines. Students will be encouraged to develop independence in a range of academic tasks. They will participate in debates and lead classroom workshops; read and interpret literary works and academic texts; write essays, narratives, and reports; and apply a range of learning strategies and research skills effectively. Students will further develop their ability to respond critically to print and media texts.
Prerequisite: None

ENGLISH LITERACY DEVELOPMENT

English Literacy Development, ELD Level 2, Open (ELDBO)
This course is intended for English language learners who have had limited access to schooling and thus have gaps in their first-language literacy skills. Students will use their developing listening and speaking skills to communicate in English for a variety of purposes; develop reading strategies to understand a variety of simple texts; produce simple forms of writing; apply increasing knowledge of English grammatical structures in speaking an writing; expand their vocabulary; and develop fundamental study skills. The course will also provide opportunities for students to become familiar with and use school and community resources and to build their knowledge of Canada and diversity.
Prerequisite: None

English Literacy Development, ELD Level 3, Open (ELDCO)
This course builds on students’ growing literacy and language skills and extends their ability to communicate in English about familiar and school-related topics. Students will make brief oral presentations; improve their literacy skills through a variety of contextualized and supported reading and writing tasks; distinguish between fact and opinion in short written and oral texts; complete short guided-research projects; and engage in a variety of cooperative learning activities. The course will also enable students to strengthen and extend their study skills and personal-management strategies and to broaden their understanding of Canadian diversity and citizenship.
Prerequisite: None

English Literacy Development, ELD Level 4, Open (ELDDO)
This course extends students’ literacy skills and ability to apply learning strategies effectively, and teaches them how to use community resources to enhance lifelong learning. Students will communicate with increased accuracy and fluency for a variety of academic and everyday purposes; perform a variety of guided reading, writing, and viewing tasks; and use media and community resources to complete guided-research projects. This
course further develops the critical thinking skills students will need to participate in Canadian society as informed citizens.
Prerequisite: None

FRENCH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE

Core French, Grade 9, Open (FSF1O)
This is an introductory course for students who have little or no knowledge of French or who have not accumulated the minimum of 600 hours of elementary Core French instruction. Students will begin to understand and speak French in guided and structured interactive settings, and will develop fundamental skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing through discussing issues and situations that are relevant to their daily lives. Throughout the course, students will develop their awareness of diverse French-speaking communities in Canada and acquire an understanding and appreciation of these communities. They will also develop a variety of skills necessary for lifelong language learning.
Prerequisite: None

GUIDANCE AND CAREER EDUCATION

Career Studies, Grade 10, Open (GLC2O)
This course teaches students how to develop and achieve personal goals for future learning, work, and community involvement. Students will assess their interests, skills, and characteristics and investigate current economic and workplace trends, work opportunities, and ways to search for work. The course explores postsecondary learning and career options, prepares students for managing work and life transitions, and helps students focus on their goals through the development of a career plan.
Prerequisite: None

GUIDANCE AND CAREER EDUCATION

Healthy Active Living Education, Grade 10, Open (PPL2O)
This course enables students to further develop the knowledge and skills they need to make healthy choices now and lead healthy, active lives in the future. Through participation in a wide range of physical activities, students develop knowledge and skills related to movement competence and personal fitness that provide a foundation for active living. Students also acquire an understanding of the factors and skills that contribute to healthy development and learn how their own well-being is affected by, and affects, the world around them. Students build their sense of self, learn to interact positively with others, and develop their ability to think critically and creatively
Prerequisite: None

Healthy Active Living Education, Grade 11, Open (PPL3O)
This course enables students to further develop the knowledge and skills they need to make healthy choices now and lead healthy, active lives in the future. Through participation in a wide range of physical activities and exposure to a broader range of activity settings, students enhance their movement competence, personal fitness, and confidence. Students also acquire an understanding of the factors and skills that contribute to healthy development and learn how their own well-being is affected by, and affects, the world around them. Students build their sense of self, learn to interact positively with others, and develop their ability to think critically and creatively.
Prerequisite: None

Healthy Active Living Education, Grade 12, Open (PPL4O)
This course enables students to further develop the knowledge and skills they need to make healthy choices. It places special emphasis on how students can maintain the habits of healthy, active living throughout their lives as they make the transition to adulthood and independent living. Through participation in a wide range of physical activities in a variety of settings, students can enhance their movement competence, personal fitness, and confidence. Students also acquire an understanding of the factors and skills that contribute to healthy development and learn how their own well-being is affected by, and affects, the world around them. Students build their sense of self, learn to interact positively with others, and develop their ability to think critically and creatively.
Prerequisite: None

MATHEMATICS

Principles of Mathematics, Grade 9, Academic (MPM1D)
This course enables students to develop an understanding of mathematical concepts related to algebra, analytic geometry, and measurement and geometry through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will investigate relationships, which they will then generalize as equations of lines, and will determine the connections between different representations of a linear relation. They will also explore relationships that emerge from the measurement of three-dimensional figures and two-dimensional shapes. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.
Prerequisite: None

Principles of Mathematics, Grade 10, Academic (MPM 2D)
This course enables students to broaden their understanding of relationships and extend their problem-solving and algebraic skills through investigation, the effective use of technology, and abstract reasoning. Students will explore quadratic relations and their applications; solve and apply linear systems; verify properties of geometric figures using analytic geometry; and investigate the trigonometry of right and acute triangles. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.
Prerequisite: Mathematics, Grade 9, Academic or Applied

Functions, Grade 11, University Preparation (MCR3U)
This course introduces the mathematical concept of the function by extending students’ experiences with linear and quadratic relations. Students will investigate properties of discrete and continuous functions, including trigonometric and exponential functions; represent functions numerically, algebraically, and graphically; solve problems involving applications of functions; investigate inverse functions; and develop facility in determining equivalent algebraic expressions. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems.
Prerequisite: Principles of Mathematics, Grade 10, Academic

Advanced Functions, Grade 12, University Preparation (MHF4U)
This course extends students’ experience with functions. Students will investigate the properties of polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; develop techniques for combining functions; broaden their understanding of rates of change; and develop facility in applying these concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended both for students taking the Calculus and Vectors course as a prerequisite for a university program and for those wishing to consolidate their understanding of mathematics before proceeding to any one of a variety of university programs.
Prerequisite: Functions, Grade 11, University Preparation, or Mathematics for College Technology, Grade 12, College Preparation

Calculus and Vectors, Grade 12, University Preparation (MCV4U)
This course builds on students’ previous experience with functions and their developing understanding of rates of change. Students will solve problems involving geometric and algebraic representations of vectors and representations of lines and planes in three-dimensional space; broaden their understanding of rates of change to include the derivatives of polynomial, sinusoidal, exponential, rational, and radical functions; and apply these concepts and skills to the modelling of real-world relationships. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended for students who choose to pursue careers in fields such as science, engineering, economics, and some areas of business, including those students who will be required to take a university-level calculus, linear algebra, or physics course.
Note: The Advanced Functions course (MHF4U) must be taken prior to or concurrently with Calculus and Vectors (MCV4U).

Mathematics of Data Management, Grade 12, University Preparation (MDM 4U)
This course broadens students’ understanding of mathematics as it relates to managing data. Students will apply methods for organizing and analysing large amounts of information; solve problems involving probability and statistics; and carry out a culminating investigation that integrates statistical concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. Students planning to enter university programs in business, the social sciences, and the humanities will find this course of particular interest.
Prerequisite: Functions, Grade 11, University Preparation, or Functions and Applications, Grade 11, University/College Preparation

SCIENCES

Science, Grade 9, Academic (SNC1D)
This course enables students to understand basic concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics; to develop skills in the processes of scientific inquiry; and to relate science to technology, society, and the environment. Students will learn scientific theories and conduct investigations related to cell division and reproduction; atomic and molecular structures and the properties of elements and compounds; the universe and space exploration; and the principles of electricity.
Prerequisite: None

Science, Grade 10, Academic (SNC2D)
This course enables students to enhance their understanding of concepts in biology, chemistry, earth and space science, and physics, and of the interrelationships between science, technology, society, and the environment. Students are also given opportunities to further develop their scientific investigation skills. Students will plan and conduct investigations and develop their understanding of scientific theories related to the connections between cells and systems in animals and plants; chemical reactions, with a particular focus on acid–base reactions; forces that affect climate and climate change; and the interaction of light and matter.
Prerequisite: Science, Grade 9, Academic or Applied

Biology, Grade 11, University Preparation (SBI3U)
This course furthers students’ understanding of the processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biodiversity; evolution; genetic processes; the structure and function of animals; and the anatomy, growth, and function of plants. The course focuses on the theoretical aspects of the topics under study, and helps students refine skills related to scientific investigation.
Prerequisite: Science, Grade 10, Academic

Biology, Grade 12, University Preparation (SBI4U)
This course provides students with the opportunity for in-depth study of the concepts and processes that occur in biological systems. Students will study theory and conduct investigations in the areas of biochemistry, metabolic processes, molecular genetics, homeostasis, and population dynamics. Emphasis will be placed on the achievement of detailed knowledge and the refinement of skills needed for further study in various branches of the life sciences and related fields.
Prerequisite: Biology, Grade 11, University Preparation

Chemistry, Grade 11, University Preparation (SCH3U)
This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of the properties of chemicals and chemical bonds; chemical reactions and quantitative relationships in those reactions; solutions and solubility; and atmospheric chemistry and the behaviour of gases. Students will further develop their analytical skills and investigate the qualitative and quantitative properties of matter, as well as the impact of some common chemical reactions on society and the environment.
Prerequisite: Science, Grade 10, Academic

Chemistry, Grade 12, University Preparation (SCH4U)
This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of organic chemistry, the structure and properties of matter, energy changes and rates of reaction, equilibrium in chemical systems, and electrochemistry. Students will further develop their problem-solving and investigation skills as they investigate chemical processes, and will refine their ability to communicate scientific information. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of chemistry in everyday life and on evaluating the impact of chemical technology on the environment.
Prerequisite: Chemistry, Grade 11, University Preparation

Physics, Grade 11, University Preparation (SPH3U)
This course develops students’ understanding of the basic concepts of physics. Student will study the laws of dynamics and explore different kinds of forces, the quantification and forms of energy (mechanical, sound, light, thermal, and electrical), and the way energy is transformed and transmitted. They will develop scientific-inquiry skills as they verify accepted laws and solve both assigned problems and those emerging from their investigations. Students will also analyze the interrelationships between physics and technology, and consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.
Prerequisite: Science, Grade 10, Academic

Physics, Grade 12, University Preparation (SPH4U)
This course enables students to deepen their understanding of physics concepts and theories. Students will continue their exploration of energy transformations and the forces that affect motion, and will investigate electrical, gravitational, and magnetic fields and electromagnetic radiation. Students will also explore the wave nature of light, quantum mechanics, and special relativity. They will further develop their scientific investigation skills, learning, for example, how to analyse, qualitatively and quantitatively, data related to a variety of physics concepts and principles. Students will also consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.
Prerequisite: Physics, Grade 11, University Preparation

SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES

Nutrition and Health, Grade 12, University Preparation (HFA4U)
This course examines the relationships between food, energy balance, and nutritional status; the nutritional needs of individuals at different stages of life; and the role of nutrition in health and disease. Students will evaluate nutrition-related trends and will determine how food choices can promote food security and environmental responsibility. Students will learn about healthy eating, expand their repertoire of food-preparation techniques, and develop their social science research skills by investigating issues related to nutrition and health.
Prerequisite: Any university or university/college preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English, or Canadian and world studies

COMPUTER STUDIES

Introduction to Computer Science, Grade 11, University Preparation (ICS3U)
This course introduces students to computer science. Students will design software independently and as part of a team, using industry-standard programming tools and applying the software development life-cycle model. They will also write and use subprograms within computer programs. Students will develop creative solutions for various types of problems as their understanding of the computing environment grows. They will also explore environmental and ergonomic issues, emerging research in computer science, and global career trends in computer-related fields.
Prerequisite: None

Computer Science, Grade 12, University Preparation (ICS4U)
This course enables students to further develop knowledge and skills in computer science. Students will use modular design principles to create complex and fully documented programs, according to industry standards. Student teams will manage a large software development project, from planning through to project review.
Students will also analyse algorithms for effectiveness. They will investigate ethical issues in computing and further explore environmental issues, emerging technologies, areas of research in computer science, and careers in the field.
Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Science, Grade 11, University Preparation